Sochi Winter Games highlights, February 2014

Posted by on Mar 4, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Sochi Winter Games highlights, February 2014

The most expensive and ambitious Winter Olympic Games have sadly come to an end in Sochi, Russia so CK Ski has put together top highlights from the 16-day period. From glorious victories, to emotional defeats, new Olympic records to controversial views, the 22nd Winter Olympic Games is certainly unforgettable!

The slight mishap of the failed Olympic ring lighting in the opening ceremony should not deter Russia from feeling proud of hosting a successful and impressive Games. The venues were packed with enthusiastic spectators, the sun shone in periods over the two weeks and the Home Nation came top of the medal table, a huge improvement from their 11th place at Vancouver 2010.

 

Norwegian glory

Sochi 2014 is certainly memorable for the Norwegians, with Ole Einar Bjoerdalen and Marit Bjoerden setting prestigious Olympic records. The ‘Queen of Nordic skiing’, from Norway won three Gold medals in Sochi, making her the most successful female athlete in Winter Olympic history. Ole Einar Bjoerdalen was crowned the greatest Winter Olympian of all time, winning two Gold medals in Sochi, totaling 13 medals throughout his career. He started his Olympic career in Lillehammer in 1994 and sadly has announced his recent retirement.

 

Ski cross crash


The Ski and Boarder Cross always creates an air of excitement and this year, both events did not disappoint. Did you watch the men’s Ski Cross quarterfinal? Four athletes battled to finish in first or second place, to qualify for the semi finals. It was a close race throughout with all four athletes in line at the last stretch, but a spectacular crash over the final jump, resulted in 3 out of the 4 athletes falling metres from the finish line.

 

Nice one Netherlands

The Netherlands Speed Skating community can feel incredibly proud of their team’s achievements after winning 23 out of the 36 medals available for the discipline. The team created five new Olympic records, including beating the Winter Olympic single sport medal record.

 

True sportsmanship

Canadian coach Justin Wadsworth showed the true meaning of sportsmanship, when he helped his opposing Russian team’s Cross Country skier, Anton Gafarov, finish the sprint semi final after a bad crash. Justin rushed onto the course and replaced Anton’s badly damaged ski, so he could finish the race.

 

Skating soap drama

There have been various controversial views over the women’s figure skating results, where Russian skater, Adelina Sotnikova beat previous Gold medal winner Yuna Kim from South Korea. Over one million people have signed a petition concerning the event juding, which has sadly ended with Yuna Kim retiring from the sport. This is a great shame for South Korea, who host the next Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, 2018.

 

Hong Kong hero

Pan To Barton should feel proud of being the first athlete to represent Hong Kong at the Winter Olympics in Short Track. We look forward to seeing him again in PyeongChang in four year’s time.

 

Womens snowboard slopestyle final

Womens snowboard slopestyle final

Go Team GB

TeamGB have also celebrated their most successful Olympics since 1924, with 14 athletes finishing in the top 10. A big well done to Lizzie Yarnold for winning Gold in the Skeleton, Jenny Jones for winning Bronze in Snowboard Slopestyle and the Men and Women’s curling teams winning Silver and Bronze respectively.

 

The next chapter

The next Winter Olympics will be held in PyeongChang, South Korea in 2018. Before that, we’re also anticipating some excellent action and drama in the Winter Paralympics from 7th-16th March, with the opening ceremony being held on the 7th March.

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